Leadership as hosting

October 18, 2017 § Leave a comment

Have you ever thought of leadership, or leaderful behaviour, as a hosting activity?

If you’re hosting a meeting, you might find yourself:

  • Providing conditions and group process for people to work together
  • Ensuring the resource of time (the scarcest commodity of all)
  • Keeping bureaucracy at bay
  • Reflecting back how people are doing, and insisting that everyone – and the system itself – creates space for reflection and learning
  • Co-designing relevant measures of progress

hosting a meeting

And from a wider perspective, I’m finding that more and more people are fulfilling their leadership roles in organisations by acting in similar ways. They’re giving up trying to manage away instability, and instead to create an organisation which can survive and thrive within its unstable world.

If this sounds relevant to you, you may be interested in Meg’s article “Leadership in the age of complexity: from hero to host”. It is full of really practical, hands-on advice for those who bear responsibility for supporting people or organisations through times of complexity and difficulty.

“From hero to host”?

It can be tempting in these times to yearn for an old-fashioned hero to steer us through. You know, the hero in the movies who rides up on a horse just at the moment of crisis. They have the guns on their hips and all the answers in their saddlebag. They’re great at issuing orders and saying they’re keeping control of everything (despite what everyone else knows).

Well, Meg offers some advice here.

“It is time for all the heroes to go home, as the poet William Stafford wrote. It is time for us to give up these hopes and expectations that only bleed dependency and passivity, and that do not give us solutions to the challenges we face. … It is time to face the truth of our situation – that we’re all in this together, that we all have a voice – and figure out how to mobilize the hearts and minds of everyone in our workplaces and communities.”

And so what is better, other than more command and control? To build buy-in through collaboration; to reward people’s yearning for meaning and possibility in their lives and work; to be a holding vessel, hosting conditions for working and learning together.

And if we’re working with people who have given up, or who are feeling discounted, ignored or invisible: let’s use our deep sincerity, and our convening skills, to open up invitations to re-engagement.

(More practical details for leadership as hosting are in the article; and http://www.artofhosting.org/what-is-aoh/methods/ has some relevant processes too.)

And what if we think we’re heroes too? Our good intentions, and our dreams for community and planet, drive us to work and work; and somehow if we just worker harder and smarter, we’ll breakthrough and everything will be sorted.

Well, there’s some final advice for you from Meg: it’s time for the heroes to go home!

And, to notice that actually we’re not alone, we’re surrounded by those who want to help and who aren’t anyway looking for heroes.

They might, instead, welcome a good host.

 

Meg’s extensive collection of articles are free for download at  http://margaretwheatley.com/library/

Leadership in these times:

A rare one day workshop in London with Meg Wheatley
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A day 20 years in the making…

September 15, 2017 § Leave a comment

– and a link to some of Meg’s writings on leadership.
NB This post is in relation to a workshop with Meg Wheatley, a writer and consultant who has inspired a generation of leaders to step forward and serve.
Leadership in these times, 9 November 2017, London www.megwheatleyinlondon2017.eventbrite.co.uk.
The foundations for this event were laid 20 years ago, when Meg wrote a seminal article entitled Goodbye Command and Control.
I was introduced at about that time to Meg’s writings (all Meg’s articles, recorded talks etc  are freely available at  http://margaretwheatley.com/library/) by my consultant/coaching colleague, Penny Kay, and together we’ve kept in touch with Meg’s new thinking over the years.

So you can imagine our delighted when Meg responded to our out-of-the-blue “20th anniversary e-mail”, inviting her to put on an event on leadership next time she was in the UK.
Leadership in these times is the result.
The day offers a great opportunity for those who work with people in leadership roles, to be more aware of effective contemporary leadership, and to support leaders to reclaim a leadership which re-engages people and creates possibility even amidst disruption and distraction.
For more information and to book, visit www.megwheatleyinlondon2017.eventbrite.co.uk

“Good leaders find it increasingly difficult to use the processes and practices that worked well in the past to evoke people’s inherent motivation, commitment, and creativity.  Yet if we notice who we’ve become, we can recommit to who we choose to be as a leader for this time.” Meg Wheatley

Some of Meg’s articles on leadership:

Lots of exciting outcomes for the Meg Wheatley event in November

September 13, 2017 § Leave a comment

www.megwheatleyinlondon2017.eventbrite.co.uk

With my coaching colleague Penny Kay, I am co-hosting a rare one day event with Margaret Wheatley on 9th November 2017 in London.

Some of you have been asking about outcomes for the day. You will be leaving the seminar with so many thoughts and feelings and aspirations I am sure, but here is what Meg has said recently about what to expect:

This is a time of profound disruption, when the best laid plans of leaders can be swept away by both man-made and natural disasters. Added to this uncertainty are the increasing levels of distraction, time compression, anxiety and stress that have distorted people’s lives and attitudes. Good leaders find it increasingly difficult to use the processes and practices that worked well in the past to evoke people’s inherent motivation, commitment, and creativity.  Yet if we notice who we’ve become, we can recommit to who we choose to be as a leader for this time.  Contemplation, learning from experience, and thinking are the keys to assist us in reclaiming leadership that re-engages people and creates possibility even amidst disruption.

Outcomes from the day:

1.  To develop increased awareness of who you’ve become as a leader, given the pressures and stresses of this time

2.  To commit to leadership that best serves people at this time, i.e. trustworthy, ethical, discerning

3.  To experience the power of contemplation and time to think

4.  To commit to instituting time to think, both personally and for your team or organization.

 

Please contact me for more information; to book your place click this link: www.megwheatleyinlondon2017.eventbrite.co.uk

International participation at the upcoming leadership workshop with Meg Wheatley, 9 November 2017

August 16, 2017 § Leave a comment

As befits someone with such a global reputation, we’re delighted to see the widening international participation at Meg Wheatley’s Leadership in these times workshop in London on 9 November.

We’ve welcomed recent bookings from continental Europe, expanding both the insights available and the potential outcomes for this day-long inquiry into leadership: how has our own leadership has changed in the past two decades; and what form of leadership are we called to?

For more information, please contact me or visit  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/leadership-in-these-times-with-meg-wheatley-tickets-35507976313

 

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